Monday, May 23, 2016

11 Things for Clarity, Pragmatism and just the right amount of Disruption

Do you know what's happening across the organisation and what it means for your area of the business? Or do you rely on your employees to do the right thing for the business as a whole?

These and a raft of other questions are frequently asked by Executives that are connected with what's going on both in their own business unit and wider organisation. Through clarity, pragmatism and just the right amount of disruption, these Executives are connected in a way that increases the level of business benefit they can achieve through their operational and project activities.

We've identified #11Things we believe only a connected Executive could know...

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Wednesday, January 20, 2016

A New Year Sanity Check

2016 is underway and it'll be February before we know it. As per normal at this time of year, much is being written about resolutions; who's making them, why they fail, and whether or not we should even bother. Resolutions are great, if you like that kind of thing, and congrats to all those who do actually set, keep and achieve theirs.

Funny thing is resolutions seem to be the exclusive territory of individuals. While some people might set resolutions with a work related component, e.g.: better work / life balance, change jobs, finish a degree, I can honestly say I've not heard any from organisations or that relate to work-place behaviours or activities.

Perhaps this is a missed opportunity...

Monday, December 7, 2015

Merry Christmas



Season's Greetings and Warm Holiday Wishes

from Deanne and all the team at Unlike Before




Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Book Review: Program Management

There's an awful lot written about program and project management (PPM). Much of it about the function of providing central admin and tools to support the 'how to' of managing PPM, rather than an effective organisational system that delivers the strategy.

Program Management by Michel Thiry (Published by Gower Publishing Ltd, 2010) covers both and it's refreshingly coherent.